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Executive Board Elections

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Help shape the future of the Vietnamese community in North America!

Collective Philanthropy Project

The Collective Philanthropy Project (CPP) is an initiative for Vietnamese students and community organizations to collaborate and partner with in working towards one charitable cause. CPP assists North American Vietnamese nonprofit/philanthropic organizations to better achieve their mission through collective and collaborative partnership with UNAVSA.

Virtual Experience

We are excited to be hosting our first-ever virtual experience called “Connecting with U(s)” on July 23 – 26, 2020! We invite you to embark on this virtual journey with us as we host keynotes, workshops, and entertainment that centers around education, empowerment, and community!

2020 Project

Voter participation for Asian Americans is especially low for age range 18-34. We’re on a mission to register 100,000 AAPIs by the 2020 Elections. We are doing this by raising awareness, providing education, and giving a space for civic engagement on the local, regional, and national scale. 

Mentorship Program

Our Mentorship Program seeks to engage alumni with high potential members to help develop the next generation of Vietnamese leaders and professionals through lived experiences in their career paths and with their involvements within the community.

VSAcademy

At VSAcademy, we are all about the love of knowledge and delivering a beautiful learning experience. VSAcademy offers curated content to educate Vietnamese American & Canadian young leaders. We encourage our constituents to experience the world of knowledge through a variety of mediums – videos, podcasts, playlists, articles, etc. 

Our Updates

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On this day, UNAVSA highlights National Indigenous Peoples Day which recognizes and celebrates the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples in Canada. Historically, Indigenous peoples and communities would embrace their culture and heritage on or near this day due to the summer solstice being the year’s longest day.

We encourage our constituents to take this opportunity to learn and acknowledge the name of the traditional territory which they reside on. A land acknowledgement serves as a commitment to decolonization and understanding the history of Indigenous peoples, as well as the role that settlers play - and continue to play - in colonization. We hope our constituents recognize and respect Indigenous peoples’ inherent kinship to the land while commemorating their culture today.

Here are some resources that can assist you with sparking that initial dialogue and getting informed about current Indigenous issues in Canada:

1) The importance of land acknowledgements:
(www.immigrant-education.ca/knowledge-base/land-acknowledgement/#1530131669033-4d51099b-4f94)

2) Beyond 94 - 94 calls to action that monitor the progress of reconciliation in Canada:
(newsinteractives.cbc.ca/longform-single/beyond-94?&cta=1)

3) Resources, compiled by the city of Vancouver, for the virtual celebration of National Indigenous Peoples Day:
(vancouver.ca/files/cov/national-indigenous-peoples-day-resources.pdf)

#UNAVSA #IndigenousPeoplesDay #FirstNations #Inuit #Métis #Reconciliation #CulturalHeritage
... See MoreSee Less

On this day, UNAVSA highlights National Indigenous Peoples Day which recognizes and celebrates the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples in Canada. Historically, Indigenous peoples and communities would embrace their culture and heritage on or near this day due to the summer solstice being the year’s longest day.

We encourage our constituents to take this opportunity to learn and acknowledge the name of the traditional territory which they reside on. A land acknowledgement serves as a commitment to decolonization and understanding the history of Indigenous peoples, as well as the role that settlers play - and continue to play - in colonization. We hope our constituents recognize and respect Indigenous peoples’ inherent kinship to the land while commemorating their culture today.

Here are some resources that can assist you with sparking that initial dialogue and getting informed about current Indigenous issues in Canada:

1) The importance of land acknowledgements: 
(https://www.immigrant-education.ca/knowledge-base/land-acknowledgement/#1530131669033-4d51099b-4f94) 
 
2) Beyond 94 - 94 calls to action that monitor the progress of reconciliation in Canada:
(https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/longform-single/beyond-94?&cta=1) 

3) Resources, compiled by the city of Vancouver, for the virtual celebration of National Indigenous Peoples Day:
(https://vancouver.ca/files/cov/national-indigenous-peoples-day-resources.pdf)

#UNAVSA #IndigenousPeoplesDay #FirstNations #Inuit #Métis #Reconciliation #CulturalHeritage

For this year’s World Refugee Day, we wanted to bring more recognition to the 3 distinct Vietnamese Migration Waves to North America and spread more awareness about the unique challenges that each wave faces. The most common overlapping challenge however is mental health and language access.
.
View our 12 page PDF document (bit.ly/unavsa_OverSEA_HowWeGotHere) to learn more about the history of each wave, the unique challenges currently being faced by the Vietnamese people of each wave, and resources that can help.
.
Keep in mind that some dates are listed as circa because migration waves can be benchmarked by many different factors and often overlap with each other.
.
Typically, the three migration waves are focused on the post-war circumstances and can be grouped as such: 1) evacuees, 2) boat refugees, 3) Amerasians and political prisoners. Our article offers a different lens that groups Vietnamese migration by the challenges they face now.
.
To download the entire timeline as a series or one image, head to: unavsa.org/policy-timelines/. There, you can also view our United States and Canada Immigration & Education Policy Timelines. For direct questions or comments, please contact civic@unavsa.org.
.
#UNAVSA #OVERSEA #HOWWEGOTHERE #WORLDREFUGEEDAY #MIGRATION #WAVES #TIMELINE
... See MoreSee Less

For this year’s World Refugee Day, we wanted to bring more recognition to the 3 distinct Vietnamese Migration Waves to North America and spread more awareness about the unique challenges that each wave faces. The most common overlapping challenge however is mental health and language access.
.
View our 12 page PDF document (bit.ly/unavsa_OverSEA_HowWeGotHere) to learn more about the history of each wave, the unique challenges currently being faced by the Vietnamese people of each wave, and resources that can help.
.
Keep in mind that some dates are listed as circa because migration waves can be benchmarked by many different factors and often overlap with each other.
.
Typically, the three migration waves are focused on the post-war circumstances and can be grouped as such: 1) evacuees, 2) boat refugees, 3) Amerasians and political prisoners. Our article offers a different lens that groups Vietnamese migration by the challenges they face now.
.
To download the entire timeline as a series or one image, head to: unavsa.org/policy-timelines/. There, you can also view our United States and Canada Immigration & Education Policy Timelines. For direct questions or comments, please contact civic@unavsa.org.
.
#UNAVSA #OVERSEA #HOWWEGOTHERE #WORLDREFUGEEDAY #MIGRATION #WAVES #TIMELINE

June 19th, 1865 represents the end of formalized slavery in the United States, when the Emancipation Proclamation was finally read aloud to the last slaves in Texas—two and a half years after it was issued on January 1, 1863. The 13th amendment to abolish slavery would yet to be ratified until December 6, 1865. UNAVSA recognizes the importance of Juneteenth as we stand in solidarity with the Black community in the Black Lives Matter movement and its demands to end state-sanctioned violence.

While Juneteenth represents freedom for some, it serves as a reminder that equality has long been delayed for our Black and Brown peers. Despite the ratification of the 13th Amendment, the legacies of slavery, slave codes, and slave patrols are recast in today’s contemporary police system, forced labor and confinement, the prison industrial complex, and systematic criminalization, disenfranchisement, and outright violence against Black people. While 47 of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia currently recognize Juneteenth as either a state holiday or ceremonial holiday, all 50 states still allow slavery and forced labor.

Grappling with our history is vital to progressing the fight for equality, equity, and justice. Since Juneteenth is yet to be recognized as a national holiday, most people do not learn about the history and meaning of Juneteenth to the same extent as other historical dates; similarly, awareness and actions against slavery, prison labor, and similar forms of forced work in the present day are limited. This weekend, The Movement for Black Lives (instagram.com/mvmnt4blklives) is calling for mass mobilization across the world. In light of this, we are asking constituents to take action from home, in your community, or in DC to support the movement’s demands for defunding of police and investment in Black communities.

-Join M4BL’s sixnineteen mobilization:
sixnineteen.com

Take direct action! Sign the petition:
-Abolish Prison Labor in the U.S.
change.org/p/federal-bureau-of-prisons-abolish-prison-labour-in-the-usa

More on Juneteenth:
-What is Juneteenth?
pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/what-is-juneteenth/
-Celebrate Juneteenth!
criticalresistance.org/resources/current-analysis/celebrate-juneteenth/

More on contemporary slavery:
-American Slavery, Reinvented
theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/prison-labor-in-america/406177/
-Slavery is Still Legal in the United States
newsweek.com/slavery-still-legal-united-states-365547

More on policing:
-Time: How the U.S. Got Its Police Force
time.com/4779112/police-history-origins/
-Additional reading
plsonline.eku.edu/insidelook/brief-history-slavery-and-origins-american-policing?fbclid=IwAR3JKJkFZcSBM9mk2D3KJF-JCakf29Lf2salN_QzFl_vWJ8EyXmE5YILs0E
-What do we mean when we say defund the police?
twitter.com/gv4et/status/1268565284559847424

#UNAVSA #JUNETEENTH #JUNE191865 #JUNE19 #FREEDOM #BLM #BLACKLIVESMATTER
... See MoreSee Less

June 19th, 1865 represents the end of formalized slavery in the United States, when the Emancipation Proclamation was finally read aloud to the last slaves in Texas—two and a half years after it was issued on January 1, 1863. The 13th amendment to abolish slavery would yet to be ratified until December 6, 1865. UNAVSA recognizes the importance of Juneteenth as we stand in solidarity with the Black community in the Black Lives Matter movement and its demands to end state-sanctioned violence.

While Juneteenth represents freedom for some, it serves as a reminder that equality has long been delayed for our Black and Brown peers. Despite the ratification of the 13th Amendment, the legacies of slavery, slave codes, and slave patrols are recast in today’s contemporary police system, forced labor and confinement, the prison industrial complex, and systematic criminalization, disenfranchisement, and outright violence against Black people. While 47 of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia currently recognize Juneteenth as either a state holiday or ceremonial holiday, all 50 states still allow slavery and forced labor.

Grappling with our history is vital to progressing the fight for equality, equity, and justice. Since Juneteenth is yet to be recognized as a national holiday, most people do not learn about the history and meaning of Juneteenth to the same extent as other historical dates; similarly, awareness and actions against slavery, prison labor, and similar forms of forced work in the present day are limited. This weekend, The Movement for Black Lives (instagram.com/mvmnt4blklives) is calling for mass mobilization across the world. In light of this, we are asking constituents to take action from home, in your community, or in DC to support the movement’s demands for defunding of police and investment in Black communities.

-Join M4BL’s sixnineteen mobilization:
sixnineteen.com

Take direct action! Sign the petition:
-Abolish Prison Labor in the U.S.
change.org/p/federal-bureau-of-prisons-abolish-prison-labour-in-the-usa

More on Juneteenth:
-What is Juneteenth?
pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/what-is-juneteenth/
-Celebrate Juneteenth!
criticalresistance.org/resources/current-analysis/celebrate-juneteenth/

More on contemporary slavery:
-American Slavery, Reinvented
theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/prison-labor-in-america/406177/
-Slavery is Still Legal in the United States
newsweek.com/slavery-still-legal-united-states-365547

More on policing:
-Time: How the U.S. Got Its Police Force
time.com/4779112/police-history-origins/
-Additional reading
plsonline.eku.edu/insidelook/brief-history-slavery-and-origins-american-policing?fbclid=IwAR3JKJkFZcSBM9mk2D3KJF-JCakf29Lf2salN_QzFl_vWJ8EyXmE5YILs0E
-What do we mean when we say defund the police?
twitter.com/gv4et/status/1268565284559847424

#UNAVSA #JUNETEENTH #JUNE191865 #JUNE19 #FREEDOM #BLM #BLACKLIVESMATTER

Contact

  info@unavsa.org
  340 S Lemon Ave #8124
Walnut, CA 91789